17 Words from the 1800s We Should All Start Using Again ...

Holly

17 Words from the 1800s We Should All Start Using Again ...
17 Words from the 1800s We Should All Start Using Again ...

New slang words are invented everyday. However, there are some great words that have existed for centuries that we've already forgotten about. So instead of thinking up new words to add to the dictionary, you should try using some of the old ones. Here are a few of the best words from the 1800s that we should bring back:

Get notified about new quizzes like this.

1

Damfino

Damfino This is a slang word that used to be used all the time. It's a shortened version of "damned if I know." It's what you'd say if you had no idea how to answer someone's question.
***

Damfino is a slang word that originated in the 1800s, and is still occasionally used today. It is a contraction of the phrase "damned if I know," and is used when someone has no idea how to answer a question. The phrase is believed to have originated in the United States, and was popular among cowboys and other rural Americans. It is still used in some parts of the country, particularly in the South and Midwest.

2

Podsnappery

Podsnappery This is "an attitude toward life marked by complacency and a refusal to recognize unpleasant facts." It can also be described as a "wilful determination to ignore the objectionable or inconvenient."
***

Podsnappery is an attitude or a mindset that was popular among the upper classes of the 19th century. The term was first coined by the English novelist Charles Dickens in his 1854 novel, Hard Times. It refers to an attitude of complacency and refusal to recognize unpleasant facts. Podsnappery was often used to describe people who were overly proud and unwilling to accept any criticism.

The term was used to describe someone who was overly proud and had a strong sense of superiority. It was also used to describe someone who was unwilling to accept any criticism and believed that their own opinion was the only one that mattered. This attitude was often seen among the upper classes of the 19th century, who believed that their social status gave them an inherent right to be superior to others.

The term has since fallen out of popular usage, but its definition is still relevant today. People who exhibit podsnappery often have a sense of entitlement and are unwilling to listen to other people's opinions or accept criticism. They may also be overly proud and unwilling to accept any failure or defeat.

Frequently asked questions

Words from the 1800s include terms like 'fandangle' meaning something ornamental or unnecessary, 'lollygag' meaning to spend time aimlessly, and 'brabble' which refers to a petty argument.

Using old words from the 1800s can be fun and add flavor to our language. It also helps keep the history of language alive and allows us to experience the charm and character of past communication styles.

You can learn old 1800s words by reading literature from that period, looking up historical word lists, or by using resources like historical dictionaries and websites dedicated to archaic language.

While not all words from the 1800s are commonly used today, many of them are still relevant and can be understood in context. They can add a playful or nostalgic element to modern conversation.

Yes, incorporating old words into your everyday language can greatly expand your vocabulary and improve your understanding of how words evolve over time.

You can start by choosing a few old words you like and using them in place of their modern equivalents or when they fit the situation. Practice them with friends or include them in writing to get comfortable.

It depends on the setting and the word. Some old words may be seen as whimsical and not suitable for formal or professional conversation, while others have retained their seriousness and can be used appropriately.

Yes, there are many archaic words related to food, such as 'kickshaw' for a fancy but insubstantial dish, or 'slumgullion' for a watery stew.

Definitely! Using old words can give your writing a unique and engaging flair. It can also set a specific tone or time period in creative works.

Some might, especially within context, but it’s possible others may not. It's important to make sure that the people you’re communicating with can follow, so you may have to explain the meanings of the words you use.

3

Bricky

Bricky Instead of saying that someone is "brave," you can say that they're "bricky." It means that they're strong, like a brick wall.
***

Bricky, a word popularized in the 1800s, is still used today to describe someone who is strong and brave. It is believed to have originated from the phrase "as strong as a brick," which was used to describe the strength of a brick wall.

Bricks have been around for centuries, and have been used to build structures and monuments since the dawn of civilization. They are a symbol of strength and resilience, and have been used to build some of the world's most iconic buildings. From the Great Wall of China to the Parthenon in Athens, bricks have been used to create some of the most impressive structures in history.

Bricks are also an important part of the culinary world. From brick ovens to brick-lined grills, they are used to cook some of the world's most delicious dishes. In addition to providing a unique flavor, brick ovens and grills are also extremely durable and can stand up to the test of time.

4

Chuckaboo

Chuckaboo This is a form of affection. It's something that you could call your friend. So if you're sick of saying "bro" and "pal," you can say "chuckaboo" instead.
***

Chuckaboo is an affectionate term used in the 1800s that is still used today. It is a way to express fondness or endearment to a friend without using the more commonly used terms such as “bro” or “pal”. It is a term of endearment that was popular in the 1800s, but has since fallen out of use in modern times.

The term “chuckaboo” is derived from the French word “chou”, which means “cabbage”. The term is believed to have originated from the phrase “chou de mon coeur”, which translates to “cabbage of my heart”. This phrase is believed to have been used as a term of endearment in the 1800s.

The term “chuckaboo” has been used in many different contexts. It can be used as a term of endearment, a term of affection, or even as a term of surprise. It can also be used as a way to show appreciation or admiration for someone.

5

Ruffles

Ruffles This was the word for "handcuffs." It sound a whole lot nicer than the word we use, doesn't it?
***

Ruffles is an interesting word from the 1800s that has been lost to time. It was used as a euphemism for “handcuffs”, and was a much more polite way of saying it. The word has an interesting origin, as it was derived from the French word “rouffle”, which means “ruffle”. This term was used in the context of the French Revolution, when people were arrested and their wrists were bound with a ruffled fabric.

Ruffles is a great word that can be used in many different contexts. It can be used to describe something that is tightly bound, or to describe a situation that is restrictive or oppressive. It can also be used to describe something that is ornate or decorative, such as a ruffled dress or a ruffled cake.

Ruffles can also be used in the culinary world. It is a type of potato chip that is made with ruffled edges, giving it a unique texture and flavor. The chips are usually thicker than regular potato chips and have a crunchier texture. The chips come in a variety of flavors, including classic, sour cream, and onion, and barbecue.

6

Lush

Lush This meant "an alcoholic drink." That shouldn't be all that hard to remember, because nowadays the word means, "one who becomes intoxicated after a few drinks and flirts with everyone."
7

Mafficking

screenshot, pc game, games, fictional character, phantosmagoriaa, This is "getting rowdy in the street." Others describe it as "rejoicing or celebrating with boisterous public demonstrations."
***

Mafficking is a term that originated in the 1800s and was used to describe a type of rowdy celebration or rejoicing. It is derived from the word “maffick”, which is a combination of the words “march” and “victory”. It is believed that the term was first used to describe the jubilant crowds that took to the streets of London to celebrate the end of the Crimean War in 1856.

The term has also been used to describe the joyous atmosphere of other large public gatherings, such as the celebrations that followed the coronation of Queen Victoria in 1838. It has been used to describe the atmosphere of fairs, festivals, and other public gatherings.

The term has also been used to describe the feeling of exuberance that can be experienced when experiencing a particularly exciting event. It has been used to describe the feeling of joy and triumph that comes with winning a competition or achieving a goal.

The term “mafficking” has been used in literature, music, and film to describe a feeling of joy and exuberance. The term has been used to describe the feeling of triumph and joy that comes with achieving a goal.

8

Caper

Caper You might know what this word means, because it's occasionally used nowadays. It's another word for "a criminal."
***

Caper is a word that has been used since the 1800s, but has become less common in modern language. It is a verb meaning to skip or jump about in a lively or playful manner. It can also be used as a noun to refer to a mischievous or playful act.

The word can also be used to refer to the edible flower bud of the Capparis spinosa plant, also known as a caper bush. This flower bud is commonly used as a seasoning in Mediterranean cuisine. The buds are usually pickled in vinegar or brine and then added to a variety of dishes.

Capers are a popular ingredient in many dishes, including salads, sauces, and pasta dishes. They are often used as a garnish for fish dishes, such as salmon or tuna. They can also be used to add flavor to dishes like omelets, risotto, and even pizza.

Capers have a distinct flavor that is slightly tart and salty. They are often described as having a mild, lemony flavor. The pickling process helps to mellow the flavor and make it more palatable.

9

Dewskich

Dewskich This is a nice way of saying "a beating." So the next time you get angry at one of your friends, tell them that you're going to give them a dewskich and see how confused they get.
***

Dewskich is an old-fashioned term that was used in the 1800s to describe a beating. It was a popular term among the working class and was often used in a humorous way. The term comes from the German word "dewsken," which means "to beat."

In the 1800s, dewskich was used as a way to express anger or annoyance. It was also used to describe a physical altercation or a fight. The term was often used in a light-hearted way and was not meant to be taken seriously.

Today, the term is rarely used, but it can still be found in some old literature and books. It has been re-popularized in recent years by some online communities, particularly those focused on food.

Dewskich can be a fun way to express your feelings of anger or annoyance. It can also be used in a humorous way to describe a physical altercation or a fight. It's a nice way to add some old-fashioned flavor to your conversations and make them more interesting. So the next time you get angry at one of your friends, tell them that you're going to give them a dewskich and see how confused they look!

10

Dipper

screenshot, This is an old word for "pickpocket." It makes sense, because in order to steal from someone, you'd need to dip your hand into their pocket.
11

Dollymop

Dollymop This is a word used to describe a "a prostitute, often an amateur or a part-time street girl." It's an insult that you can throw around whenever you're in a bad mood.
12

Knap

Knap You can probably guess what this word is. It means "to steal." That's why people who steal children are called kidnappers.
13

Lamps

Lamps This is a word used to describe "eyes." After all, when you're happy, your eyes will light up just like a lamp does.
14

Ladybird

Ladybird This is another word for "prostitute." Of course, there are plenty of other words used to describe them, like "a Judy."
***

Ladybirds have long been associated with prostitution and the practice of exchanging sex for money. In the 1800s, the term "ladybird" was a slang term used to describe a prostitute. The term was likely derived from the phrase "lady of the night" or "lady of the evening" which was commonly used to refer to female sex workers.

The term "ladybird" was also used to describe women who worked as courtesans or madams. These women provided companionship to wealthy men in exchange for money. They were often seen as glamorous and were often seen as a symbol of power and status.

In addition to being associated with prostitution, the term "ladybird" was also used to describe a woman who was independent and strong-willed. The term was often used to describe a woman who was not afraid to stand up for herself and her rights.

The term "ladybird" was also used to describe a woman who was fashionable and stylish. Women of the 1800s often used the term to describe a woman who was fashionable and had a good sense of style.

15

Lakin

Lakin This word means, "wife." So if you're married, you can ask your husband to call you by this word.
***

"Lakin," dear readers, harkens back to an era when language was dipped in a certain sweetness, much like honey to the bee. It might just be the charm needed to add a sprinkle of old-world endearment in your modern-day romance. Picture your beloved coming home from a long day, calling out, "My lakin!" with a twinkle in their eye. It's flirtatious, it's vintage—why not give it a whirl? Conjure up the allure of centuries past and keep the flame of courtly love flickering in the hearth of your own happily ever after.

16

Snowing

Snowing This is when someone steals clothes that "have been hung out to dry." It happened frequently back then, which is why the word was used more commonly than you might think.
17

Gatter

Gatter This simply means "an alcoholic drink." So ask for one the next time you visit a bar.

There are hundreds of words in the English language, and you should make it your mission to learn as many of them as possible! What other words do you think we should bring back?

Sources: tlucretius.net and mentalfloss.com

Feedback Junction

Where Thoughts and Opinions Converge

Hundreds of words???? Seriously? Maybe that was a typo. Lol

take off the beaver or hat

Wench-this means girl

Loving all the gifs from pride&prejudice;♥️

thats soooo funny

Wow these had there meaning know of few of them we've come far with English language

Fortnight

#12 thats sooo funny

thanks really helped with my school project : )

Oh wow loving those words u learn everyday

Related Topics

charlie day commencement speech quotes from toni morrison short quote about reading broad city reddit poetry for someone you love quotes about not chasing someone all we have is now quotes there is no charm equal to tenderness of heart. self eyes quotes lupita nyongo skincare

Popular Now